Episode 10: Janet Reitman

Janet Reitman is a contributing editor at Rolling Stone and is the author of Inside Scientology: The Story of America’s Most Secretive Religion.

In July 2013, she wrote the story “Jahar’s World” for Rolling Stone. The story dug deep into the life of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the surviving brother accused of the Boston Marathon bombing. That issue created a huge controversy when the magazine decided to put Tsarnaev on the cover.

Reitman’s most recent story for Rolling Stone was a Q&A with Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy, who was elected to the senate just one month before the Sandy Hook shooting.

Reitman has written about a wide range of topics, including the church of Scientology. She was nominated for a National Magazine Award for that story. She’s also covered the war in Iraq and written about Anonymous hactivists, among many other things.

In addition to Rolling Stone, her work has appeared in GQ, Men’s Journal, The New York Times Magazine, the Los Angeles Times Sunday Magazine, ESPN The Magazine and Salon. For links to many of Reitman’s stories, check out her Byliner page.

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Episode 9: Jason Fagone

Jason Fagone, a Philadelphia-based journalist who writes about science, sports and culture for Wired magazine and Philadelphia magazine. Fagone’s work has also appeared in GQ, Esquire, The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic, Slate and Deadspin.

Fagone’s most recent story — “Has Carl June Found a Key to Fighting Cancer?” — is about a cancer researcher who has found a way to treat leukemia using genetically modified T-cells. Since joining the podcast, he has written the book “Ingenious: A True Story of Invention, Automotive Daring and the Race to Revive America,” which follows the lives of several people as they attempt to engineer a radically new kind of car.

Fagone has since started his own podcast, which focuses on the ins and outs of freelancing. The podcast is called Kill Fee.

Episode 8: Luke Dittrich

Luke Dittrich has been writing for Esquire for about six years. In that time, he’s written about a man who lived most of his life with no memory (a man who was also treated by Dittrich’s grandfather), the Penn State scandal and the Joplin, Missouri, tornado that killed 160 people. That last story won Dittrich a National Magazine Award in 2012.

Most recently, he wrote the story “The Prophet.” The story is about neurosurgeon Dr. Eben Alexander, who claims to have visited heaven in a best-selling book. Dittrich’s piece pretty much debunks those claims. 

In this podcast, we talk about many of his stories, as well as how he got started reporting and who gave him the idea for the Joplin tornado story.

Since joining the podcast, Dittrich turned his story about Patient HM, the man with no memory, into a book by that same name.

Episode 7: Brian Mockenhaupt

Brian Mockenhaupt wrote the Byliner.com original “The Living and the Dead.” The story chronicles the traumatic experience of a group of Marines in Afghanistan, as well as their difficulty adjusting to life once stateside. He won the 2013 Michael Kelly Award for the story, and was also a finalist for the National Magazine Award for Feature Writing.

Mockenhaupt is a contributing editor to Readers Digest and Esquire, and is the nonfiction editor of the Journal of Military Experience. He writes regularly for The Atlantic and Outside, and his work has also appeared in Pacific Standard, Backpacker, The New York Times Magazine and Chicago.

After serving two tours in Iraq as an infantryman with the 10th Mountain Division, Mockenhaupt has written exclusively on military and veteran affairs.

He was the first in-studio guest for the podcast, as he was visiting Ashland University for the River Teeth Nonfiction Conference.

Episode 6: Jesse Lichtenstein

Jesse Lichtenstein wrote the story, “Do we really want to live without the post office” for the February issue of Esquire. The piece examines the controversy surrounding the future of the postal service, and what life without it would be like. Lichtenstein also makes the argument that the postal service binds the country together in a way little else can.

This is Lichtenstein’s first piece in Esquire, but he has written for numerous other publications, including Slate and The New York Times Magazine. He also worked as a fact checker for The New Yorker.

Episode 5: Stephen Rodrick

This week, I talk with Stephen Rodrick, a writer for The New York Times Magazine. He wrote the cover story for the Jan. 10 issue of the Times magazine, titled “The Misfits.” Online, thanks to search engine optimization, the story was called “Here is what happens when you cast Lindsay Lohan in your movie.” Rodrick was embedded with the cast and crew of the movie, The Canyons, which was directed by Paul Schrader, and starred Lindsay Lohan.

Rodrick has also written the memoir “The Magical Stranger: A Son’s Journey into his Father’s Life.”

Check out Rodrick’s Longform page to read more of his work, including stories he’s written since joining the podcast.

Episode 4: Kelley Benham French

Kelley Benham French of the Tampa Bay Times wrote the three-part series “Never let go.” The story focuses on the birth of Juniper French, the daughter of Kelley and husband Tom French (as in Pulitzer Prize-winning Tom French). Juniper was born at 23 weeks, six days and weighed just one pound, four ounces at birth.

Since joining the podcast, Kelley teamed with husband Thomas French to write “Juniper: The girl who was born too soon.” The book was just released in September 2016, and is already getting rave reviews.

While written in the first-person, this story is not your typical piece of memoir. Benham reported the hell out of this story, starting with more than 7,000 pages of medical records and continuing on with extensive interviews with ever doctor, nurse and social worker involved in her daughter’s life.

French is now a professor of practice at the Indiana University Media School. She recently worked as the editor on Lane DeGregory’s piece, “The Long Fall of Phoebe Jonchuck,” which was featured in Episode 43 of the podcast.